575-525-2450 [email protected]

The Anatomy of the Spine

Your spine is a stacked column of 24 small bones called vertebrae that are arranged in segments. Between each vertebra is a disk, a cushion of soft gel material. Disks absorb pressure and keep the bony vertebrae from rubbing against each other.

Ligaments hold spinal vertebrae in place with ligaments. Ligaments connect bones with other bones, and muscles to bones.

Like the other bones in your body, the vertebrae have joints so that the spine can move with flexibility. These are named facet joints. Arthritis in facets can cause pain.

Every vertebra in your spine has an opening in its center. The stacked vertebrae together produce a hollow tube down the spine, holding and protecting the spinal cord.

Nerve roots run from your spinal cord to the rest of the body. The spinal cord is your communication center, sending signals between your brain and the rest of your body. Without a well-functioning spine and nervous system, your body may suffer paralysis.

Spinal back surgery is very common. Before taking that final step, consider other treatments and exercises to strengthen your spine and its muscles.

Humans depend on the neck remaining in good condition. When a strong force injures your neck, or if you develop inflammation or degeneration, you will experience pain and perhaps disability.

Younger people usually incur damage caused by an injury. Sports injuries, vehicle accidents, and other blunt-force trauma can cause permanent harm and disability.

Older persons usually have more cases of degenerative disk disability. A lifetime of wear and tear can cause sometimes excruciating, long-term problems. Other common diseases of the neck can produce pain and disability.

Your Back & Spine
The spine is one of your most important body parts. Without a well-functioning set of vertebrae, you couldn’t do much of anything, and the rest of your body might quit their jobs as well.

Learn More

The Anatomy of the Spine

Your spine is a stacked column of 24 small bones called vertebrae that are arranged in segments. Between each vertebra is a disk, a cushion of soft gel material. Disks absorb pressure and keep the bony vertebrae from rubbing against each other.

Learn More

The Segments of the Spine
Four separate segments make up your spine. Each has an essential purpose.

The cervical spine is the first segment of seven vertebrae at the top. It holds your head and neck.

The thoracic spine is the second segment, located in the middle portion of your body. It consists of 12 vertebrae that control the mid-back region.

Learn More

Back Surgery
When you have intractable pain and have failed with every conservative treatment, it may be time for you and your physician to consider one of the common back surgeries. Conditions like a herniated disk or spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis may be corrected with surgery. Other problems like a serious infection or tumor, you may be left with little choice other than back surgery.

Learn More

Five Ways to Strengthen Your Back
It’s always better to keep your body strong and that especially includes your back and core muscles. By doing so, you will remain healthier, more powerful, and maintain flexibility. If you want to stave off injury and even surgery, these five exercises will help. If you can’t do them or have a lot of difficulty, it’s time to pay more attention to your back and core muscles.

Learn More

What Can Go Wrong with Your Back
There are 24 vertebrae in your entire spine, each with its own set of disks, muscles, and cartilage. That means dozens of ways you can develop back problems, whether mild or severe. Being aware of what can happen and how it will feel can alert you to conditions that need a physician’s examination. So, let’s find out what’s going in your back in the back there.

Learn More

OUR SERVICES

Learn more about the services that we offer at Atrium Physical Therapy

More Services

Atrium Physical Therapy

1115 Commerce Drive, Suite C
Las Cruces, NM 88011

Ph: (575) 525-2450
Fax: (575) 993-5380

Contact Us

We're students, parents, and weekend warriors, too